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Slideshow

Progression

 

Locking Primary School Science Progression

 

At Locking Primary School, the National Curriculum Programmes of Study for Science are followed. This progression is followed through the Science Sequences of Learning taught a Locking Primary School.

 

 

EYFS

Year 1 & 2

Year 3 & 4

Year 5 & 6

Planning

Characteristics of Effective Learning

  • Thinking of ideas
  • Finding ways to solve problems
  • Making predictions
  • Planning, making decisions about how to approach a task, solve a problem and reach a goal

Early Learning Goal

  • They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity.
  • They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities.

Exceeding ELG

  • They can talk about plans they have made to carry out activities and what they might change if they were to repeat them.

Asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways

Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them

Planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions,

While exploring the world, the children develop their ability to ask questions (such as what something is, how things are similar and different, the ways things work, which alternative is better, how things change and how they happen). Where appropriate, they answer these questions.

The children answer questions developed with the teacher often through a scenario.

The children are involved in planning how to use resources provided to answer the questions using different types of enquiry, helping them to recognise that there are different ways in which questions can be answered.

The children consider their prior knowledge when asking questions. They independently use a range of question stems. Where appropriate, they answer these questions.

The children answer questions posed by the teacher.

Given a range of resources, the children decide for themselves how to gather evidence to answer the question. They recognise when secondary sources can be used to answer questions that cannot be answered through practical work. They identify the type of enquiry that they have chosen to answer their question

Children independently ask scientific questions. This may be stimulated by a scientific experience or involve asking further questions based on their developed understanding following an enquiry.

Given a wide range of resources the children decide for themselves how to gather evidence to answer a scientific question. They choose a type of enquiry to carry out and justify their choice. They recognise how secondary sources can be used to answer questions that cannot be answered through practical work.

The children select from a range of practical resources to gather evidence to answer their questions. They carry out fair tests, recognising and controlling variables. They decide what observations or measurements to make over time and for how long. They look for patterns and relationships using a suitable sample.

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

The children select from a range of practical resources to gather evidence to answer questions generated by themselves or the teacher.

They follow their plan to carry out: observations and tests to classify; comparative and simple fair tests[1]; observations over time; and pattern seeking.

Observing and Obtaining Evidence

Characteristics of Effective Learning

  • Showing curiosity about objects
  • Using senses to explore the world around them
  • Engaging in open-ended activity
  • Maintaining focus on their activity for a period of time
  • Checking how well their activities are going
  • Paying attention to detail
  • Persisting with activity when challenges occur
  • Testing their ideas
  • Changing strategy as needed

Early Learning Goal

  • They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur, and talk about changes

Exceeding ELG

  • Children estimate, measure, weigh and compare and order objects and talk about properties, position and time

 

Observing closely, using simple equipment

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate

Children explore the world around them. They make careful observations to support identification, comparison and noticing change. They use appropriate senses, aided by equipment such as magnifying glasses or digital microscopes, to make their observations.

They begin to take measurements, initially by comparisons, then using non-standard units.

The children make systematic and careful observations.

They use a range of equipment for measuring length, time, temperature and capacity. They use standard units for their measurements.

The children select measuring equipment to give the most precise results e.g. ruler, tape measure or trundle wheel, force meter with a suitable scale.

During an enquiry, they make decisions e.g. whether they need to: take repeat readings (fair testing); increase the sample size (pattern seeking); adjust the observation period and frequency (observing over time); or check further secondary sources (researching); in order to get accurate data (closer to the true value).

Performing simple tests

The children use practical resources provided to gather evidence to answer questions generated by themselves or the teacher. They carry out: tests to classify; comparative tests; pattern seeking enquiries; and make observations over time

Identifying and clarifying

Children use their observations and testing to compare objects, materials and living things. They sort and group these things, identifying their own criteria for sorting.

They use simple secondary sources (such as identification sheets) to name living things. They describe the characteristics they used to identify a living thing.

 

 

EYFS

Year 1 & 2

Year 3 & 4

Year 5 & 6

Recording

 

Gathering and recording data to help in answering questions

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables

Recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs

The children record their observations e.g. using photographs, videos, drawings, labelled diagrams or in writing.

They record their measurements e.g. using prepared tables, pictograms, tally charts and block graphs.

They classify using simple prepared tables and sorting rings.

The children sometimes decide how to record and present evidence. They record their observation e.g. using photographs, videos, pictures, labelled diagrams or writing. They record their measurements e.g. using tables, tally charts and bar charts (given templates, if required, to which they can add headings). They record classifications e.g. using tables, Venn diagrams, Carroll diagrams.

The children decide how to record and present evidence. They record observations e.g. using annotated photographs, videos, labelled diagrams, observational drawings, labelled scientific diagrams or writing. They record measurements e.g. using tables, tally charts, bar charts, line graphs and scatter graphs. They record classifications e.g. using tables, Venn diagrams, Carroll diagrams and classification keys. Children present the same data in different ways in order to help with answering the question.

Concluding

Characteristics of Effective Learning

  • Making links and noticing patterns in their experience
  • Developing ideas of grouping, sequences, cause and effect
  • They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events

Early Learning Goal

  • Children know the importance for good health of physical exercise, and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe
  • Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things

Exceeding ELG

  • They use a range of vocabulary to add information, express ideas, justify actions or events

Using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions

Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions

Reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations

Children use their experiences of the world around them to suggest appropriate answers to questions. They are supported to relate these to their evidence e.g. observations they have made, measurements they have taken or information they have gained from secondary sources.

The children recognise ‘biggest and smallest’, ‘best and worst’ etc. from their data.

They communicate their findings to an audience both orally and in writing, using appropriate scientific vocabulary.

In their conclusions, children: identify causal relationships and patterns in the natural world from their evidence; identify results that do not fit the overall pattern; and explain their findings using their subject knowledge.

Identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes

Children interpret their data to generate simple comparative statements based on their evidence. They begin to identify naturally occurring patterns and causal relationships.

Using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings

Children answer their own and others’ questions based on observations they have made, measurements they have taken or information they have gained from secondary sources. The answers are consistent with the evidence.

Evaluating

Characteristics of Effective Learning

  • Showing a belief  that more effort or a different approach will pay off
  • Reviewing how well the approach worked

Exceeding ELG

  • They use a range of vocabulary to add information, express ideas, justify actions or events
  • They can talk about plans they have made to carry out activities and what they might change if they were to repeat them.
  • Children talk about the ideas and processes that led them to make designs and products

 

Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

Using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

They draw conclusions based on their evidence and current subject knowledge.

They identify ways in which they adapted their method as they progressed or how they would do it differently if they repeated the enquiry.

Children use their evidence to suggest values for different items tested using the same method e.g. the distance travelled by a car on an additional surface.

Following a scientific experience, the children ask further questions which can be answered by extending the same enquiry.

Children use the scientific knowledge gained from enquiry work to make predictions they can investigate using comparative and fair tests.

Identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

Children answer their own and others’ questions based on observations they have made, measurements they have taken or information they have gained from secondary sources. When doing this, they discuss whether other evidence e.g. from other groups, secondary sources and their scientific understanding, supports or refutes their answer.

 

 

 

 

[1] A comparative test is performed by changing a variable that is qualitative e.g. the type of material, shape of the parachute. This leads to a ranked outcome. A fair test is performed by changing a variable that is quantitative e.g. the thickness of the material or the area of the canopy. This leads to establishing a causative relationship.

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