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Interesting websites

Ollee - It's not always easy to open up and talk. Ollee is here to help you have tricky conversations and to give you extra support when they need it.

 

TED-Ed is TED’s youth and education initiative. TED-Ed’s mission is to spark and celebrate the ideas of teachers and students around the world. Everything we do supports learning — from producing a growing library of original animated videos , to providing an international platform for teachers to create their own interactive lessons, to helping curious students around the globe bring TED to their schools and gain presentation literacy skills, to celebrating innovative leadership within TED-Ed’s global network of over 650,000 teachers.

 

Natural History Museum - Just because you can’t visit in person, doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy the benefits of this famous old museum. Take a virtual tour, letting David Attenborough guide you around the enormous Hintze Hall, getting a good look at Hope, the blue whale suspended from the museum’s ceiling, or simply digitally browse the library books.

 

Covering primary age all the way to 16-plus, BBC Bitesize is split into three categories – all children will have something to learn here. Whether you’ve got a teenager learning about the Spanish Armada or a young child exploring phonics – Bitesize has it covered. There are daily lessons for all ages from 9am in core subjects such as English and Maths – the content is supported by activities, videos and tests. Parents and carers, including those of SEN (special educational needs) children, can also find help.

 

See what Tate Kids has up its digital sleeves to help children learn about artists and the process of making all different types of art. Some of the world’s most famous artists are brought into focus under the “explore” tab, where you are asked “who is Salvador Dali?”, “who is Berthe Morisot?” and so on. The site offers click through options to pages on the life and works of a variety of different painters and sculptors. You can take a deep dive into different eras or styles of art – including pop art and impressionism or discover how different pieces of art might be grouped together.

 

While travelling the world seems little more than a fantasy right now, National Geographic has provided a wealth of classroom resources which help keep children connected to and interested in little-known wonders from all over the globe. The collection of “at home” lessons suit all age groups and encompass topics such as ecology and social studies. More specific subjects, such as climate change and storytelling, have dedicated areas of the site designed for immersive exploration. As you’d expect, the photography is world class and makes using this space feel really special.

 

BBC - Bitesize- We love how easily and intuitively children can navigate this colourful learning hub. Covering 14 subjects including Maths and English, as well as space and sport. There’s plenty to get stuck into, but we think this is best suited for children who are already confident readers. Alternatively, this is a great resource for parents of younger children to explore together – you could get wonderfully lost here for hours, drinking in the history and heritage of the Incas or brushing up on the times tables. The images used are plentiful, bright and clear.

 

BookTrust - The UK’s largest children’s reading charity is a hub of comfort, fun and security for families. Here bookworms will find reading recommendations, including “gentle books for troubled times”, and so much more. There’s an entire section dedicated to what authors and illustrators are offering online for children – from illustration classes, read alongs and even “story starters” to encourage youngsters in their creative writing . There are quizzes, competitions and even book-based recipes to work on – as well as print out activities meaning there is something for all children to enjoy – even those who think they hate reading!

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